Seeing and Doing Corsica

What to see and do on the Island of Corsica

To do or not to do, that is the question…

For those of you who have been following along, this is Part 4 of the Corsican series.

Below you will find both a fantastic way for you to armchair surf your way around Corsica and its culture, and a fabulous (and quite thorough) resource to keep handy for when you plan your next trip to Corsica.

So with no further ado, here is my “short” list of “must do’s” and “must see’s” for the island of Corsica. Click on a link, or two, or twenty and explore all that Corsica has to offer…

What to see and do in Corsica

Sunday Drive Ideas (or any day!)

Lazy days are perfect days for a scenic drive around the island…

  • Drive the Calanques de Piana (Porto).  There are over 600 kilometers of coast around the island, but not all is accessible by car. The Calangues de Piana is spectacular even just for a drive, in case you don’t happen to have a yacht handy.   Be prepared for narrow winding roads and crowds.
  • Drive the Strada Di l’Artigiani.  Balagne’s Artisan Route N197 is a scenic drive that starts in Calvi and drives through mountain villages perched high above the ocean allowing for spectacular views.  Stop frequently to discover local artisan works along the way. Visit Pigna if you only have time for one village.
  • Drive one or all of the ten regions on the “Route des Sens Authentique“.  An awesome way to discover products made on the island directly from the local producers themselves and taste your way around the island.
  • Cap Corse driving route - What to see and do in CorsicaDrive the fabulous Spelunca Gorge. The most spectacular part is actually even visible from the road, so you won’t have too many regrets not hiking the gorge.

Hiking opportunitiesWhat to see and do in Corsica

The GR20 is Corsica’s most famous hiking trail, but there are tons of other choices…

Sentiers des Douaniers Corsica - What to see and do in Corsica

A Cornucopia Worthy of a visitWhat to see and do in Corsica

So much to visit and so little time, but variety is the spice of life so pick a few…

Beach and Water FunWhat to see and do in Corsica

Corsica is a paradise for beach lovers and water rats everywhere…

Please your palate with the authentic foods of CorsicaWhat to see and do in Corsica

Corsican cuisine is made of  products grown and found on the island, with strong Italian influences…

Corsican cuisine is as rugged as its landscape, and greatly influenced by the island’s many aggressors over the years.”  Colette Rossant

  • Try some Charcuterie.  The island is well-known for its artisanal charcuterie and salami. There is such high demand that much of the product is sold by the time summer comes around, so be sure about what you are buying by purchasing from a reputable source. In years past, it was customary for all the locals to hang their home-made salamis and dried meats right in their own basements, and the hooks used back then can still be seen in older homes.
  • Try the Brocciu Cheese.  Myths report the recipe came from an ogre living on the island… Serve with white wine, preferably from Corsica!  Invite an ogre if you can find one.What to see and do in Corsica - Wine Regions
  • Try some fine wine from the Wine regions of Corsica.  Corsica’s wines are mainly made from indigenous Corsican grape varieties that were not struck by the virus like those in France: Nielluccio, Sciaccarello and Vermentino. I particularly enjoyed the Muscat du Cap Corse which is a lightly sweet dessert wine.
  • Try the Wild Boar Casserole (Civet de Sanglier).  Similar to a Boeuf Bourgignon Stew, but with a little bit of a gamier taste.  It’s a wild boar after all!
  • Try Corsican Lamb Stew (Agneau).  Stewed with potatoes, carrots, onion, and fresh herbs (thyme and rosemary) picked wild from the mountains.
  • Try slurping down a Pietra beer.  A local beer made from chestnuts  in the past carried in from the mountains on the backs of donkeys. About 20 kilometers south of Bastia is the hilly region of Castagniccia, which takes its name from the chestnut trees that grow abundantly here. The traditional stone-roofed houses all have chestnut-drying rooms in the attic as the perfect cool, dry environment that is inaccessible to rodents and insects.

What to see and do in Corsica

Whew! Are you exhausted yet?  That was quite the journey across Corsica…  Let me know if I missed anything!

And just in case you are just joining us, make sure to catch up on your Girl Gone Gallic reading today!  The previous posts in this series include “Wonderful Magical Corsica“, “Corsica’s Turbulent Past“, and “Picture Perfect Corsica“.  Stay tuned for the final segment of this very complete series on Corsica which will describe absolutely everything you will ever need to know on how to get there, and where to stay in style on the magnificent island of Corsica.

Happy Travels,
-Girl Gone Gallic

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  5 comments for “Seeing and Doing Corsica

  1. August 19, 2016 at 11:55 pm

    amazing, I like its..

    • August 29, 2016 at 12:47 pm

      Corsica is one of my favorite vacation spots – well worth the extra effort required to get there!

  2. June 28, 2016 at 3:50 am

    Great list, very helpful for planning our next trip to Corsica, which won’t be this year, unfortunately. May I suggest one or two more things worth seeing for history nuts like me?

    The megalithic statues at the atmospheric and haunting site of Filitosa: http://www.filitosa.fr/en/

    The house of Pasquale di Paoli (head of Corsica’s only independent 18thC republic) at Morosaglia in the Castagniccia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasquale_Paoli

    The Musée Fesch in Ajaccio, which has an extensive collection of paintings: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mus%C3%A9e_Fesch

    Thanks for these posts, giving a great flavour of Corsica.

    • June 28, 2016 at 5:10 am

      Great input! Thanks for three great suggestions. I was just about to add the magalithic statues, having come across some information on those recently although I have not visited. I will add these and any others that I think are pertinent, so even when you start planning next year there might be a few more fun surprises!

      • June 28, 2016 at 6:49 am

        We visited Filitosa a couple of years ago and I can thoroughly recommend it. Obviously, it’s a popular place among tourists, so it makes sense to turn up shortly after it opens in the morning if you can. Will look out for the surprises!

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